Category Archives: 70s

A PAINTER PAINTING A PICTURE by Peter Nolan Smith

Hitchhiking was the only way to travel between Boston and Montreal in the early 1970s. The trip was a scenic 400 miles on I-89 slanting across New Hampshire and Vermont to Lake Champlain then north into Quebec. On one trip in August of 1971 a longhair driving a van said that he needed money for […]

Rockport Quarries

In 1974 my college friends and I drove north from Boston to swim at the Rockport Quarries. The closest one was right off the road wrapping around Cape Ann. I led them to the highest point. A girl named Spooky was with us. She had long straight black hair and crooked teeth. I thought she […]

THE ERA OF ERRORS – EAST VILLAGE 1970

I have come to realize that in the 70s we sought refuge in the East Village not to escape famine violence or economic misfortune, but the repression of America’s White Majority. We were welcomed by the poor, befriended by drug dealers, and found solace in the warmth of exile in a neighborhood burning building by […]

WHEN FAT MEN FLY by Peter Nolan Smith / Chapter 1

Fat people were a rarity in 1970. Jonathan Winters was the only one appearing on TV, none resided in my neighborhood south of Boston, and only a few attended my university. I had one fat friend. His name was Wayne. He made me laugh, but I never thought of him as fat. Chubby, but not […]

WHEN FAT MEN FLY by Peter Nolan Smith / Chapter 2

A day before New Year’s Eve Sookie and Marie came over Wayne’s house. The two girls wore matching white leather jackets, mini-skirts, knee-high boots, and turtleneck sweater. They were excited about their first trip to the big city and Marie asked Wayne’s mom, “We look like sisters?” “Like Eva and Zsa-Zsa Gabor.” Wayne’s mom puffed […]