Category Archives: semi-fiction

THE INHALE OF WEED by Peter Nolan Smith

Marijuana was demonized during the 1960s. The Boston police treated reefer smokers as harshly as junkies. John Sinclair, the MC5 radical, was sentenced to ten years of prison for the crime of ‘giving’ an undercover agent two joints. The severity of his punishment did not deter the millions of marijuana smokers of the 60s and […]

FRIED CLAMS ON THE F TRAIN by Peter Nolan Smith

Yesterday I was on the subway home to Fort Greene. I edited a long short story about a softball game with pen. The 30ish woman seated next to me was slurping a big container of Dunkin’ Donuts slop. The brunette fell asleep and the cup dropped from her hand. Thankfully the lid held firm and […]

THE FLIGHT OF HISTORY by Peter Nolan Smith

At Xaverian High School outside of Boston Brother Phelan taught history without any deviation from the path of the textbook. I was Brother Phelan’s # 1 student, since I had read the textbook from beginning to end in the first week. During class I stared out the window, thinking about my cheerleader girlfriend, Janet ‘Big […]

NINES by Peter Nolan Smith

Easter was a special holiday for our family. My mother was a devout Catholic. My father had converted from agnosticism to marry his Irish bride. The Bowdoin College grad was a good dresser and they attired their six children, as if we were the jewels of empire. Every Easter we wore new clothes from tie […]

THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL OF PASSAICH by Peter Nolan Smith

When Cecil B. DeMille’s THE TEN COMMANDMENTS was released in 1956 and its box office success earned the cinematic retelling of Exodus over $180 million dollars. In 1962 Paramount Pictures re-released the film for screenings at drive-ins across the nation and my father loaded my brothers and sisters into our Ford station wagon to view […]