Category Archives: semi-fiction

A MAN OF SPEED by Peter Nolan Smith

Father’s Day has complemented Mother’s Day since 1910, although the holiday remained unofficial for decades and most Americans treated Father’s Day as a joke, until LBJ proclaimed the Third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Richard Nixon made it permanent six years later. “The only thing I get for Father’s Day are bills,” my father […]

EVERYWHERE by Peter Nolan Smith

My older brother and I went everywhere with our parents. We drove from Hingham to Maine, Watchic Pond to Boston, Falmouth Foresides to the South Shore. There were thousands of trips with my mother and father. Nowadays Frunk and I live far apart. We haven’t been in a car together for over ten years, but […]

THE ONLY YEH YEH GIRL By Peter Nolan Smith

The teenagers of the 50s worshipped Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, and Buddy Holly as dead gods, but my generation’s focus was dedicated to the living and the stars of the 1960s were transported by TV and radio to my family house south of Boston. Bob Dylan’s BLOWING IN THE WIND knocked Elvis off his throne […]

HERMAPHRODITE by Peter Nolan Smith

Back in the early 80s the Louvre belonged to art historians and a wandering art tourists. Few Parisians visited the former Bourbon palace and once a week I wandered the museum’s desolate corridors to admire its vast collection. At that time I was le psychionomiste of the Bains-Douches nightclub and my friend Alabama Tony tended […]

ROCK STANDS TALL by Peter Nolan Smith

In August 1984 ACTUEL sent a Californian-born photographer and me to cover the Deauville Film Festival. This was my second journalism gig for the esoteric French magazine and I hoped that writing a good article might open the path to another profession than being a doorman at La Balajo. The Deauville Film Festival was not […]